• FAQ

    Certain operators have offers that include applications of which the consumption is not deducted from the data volume.

    That practice, often called “zero-rating”, is not explicitly regulated by the net neutrality rules.

    One part of the net neutrality rules generally specifies that Internet traffic should be treated in the same way. 

    It was clear that this meant that it is forbidden to allow zero-rating applications to continue at the normal speed, whereas other traffic was blocked or throttled (e.g. because the data volume in the bundle was used up). 

    But whether that rule also applied to a different way of billing, without blocking or throttling in an unequal way, was not clear. 

    The European Court of Justice has ruled that this is the case. 

    Zero-rating offers for certain applications are therefore unlawful and have to be adapted. 

    If the adaptation is to your disadvantage, you have the right to cancel your contract free of charge.

  • FAQ

    A wireless local area network allows you to interconnect your devices and radio waves enable the rapid exchange of data.

    The term “Wi-Fi” was coined to get a simpler term to refer to the standards of the group IEEE 802.11, which are the ones used for wireless networks. Since 1999, several versions have followed one another, improving the quality of data transmitted per second, the signal range or the connection quality. The latest publicly accessible version is called Wi-Fi 6 (the official name of the standard is “IEEE 802.11ax”).

    Several devices are already compatible with Wi-Fi 6 or Wi-Fi 6E; these are very recent. Concerning your modem/router, there will be some time before this technology is included. At present, the Wi-Fi signal transmitted by your modem/router uses two frequency bands (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz):

    • 2.4 GHz: This frequency band, shared by numerous types of use, enables the transmission of signals over long distances and is not affected by barriers created by walls or floors;
    • 5 GHz: This frequency band is more stable and faster. Regarding data transmission, it has more and broader channels: there are 13 channels of 20 MHz or 40 MHz on 2.4 GHz. On 5 GHz, there are 13 channels of 20, 40 and 80 MHz. Most receivers are compatible with this band, which is a bit more sensitive to the presence of obstacles than the 2.4 GHz band.

    Wi-Fi 6 also uses these frequency bands. In the next development, Wi-Fi 6E (E meaning “extended”) will add the 6 GHz band.

    Compared with the previous versions, Wi-Fi 6 and Wi-Fi 6E offer:

    • A higher speed (channels up to 120 MHz);
    • A shorter response time;
    • A better connection management in case of high user density (when a large number of users are simultaneously connected to the same network, at the same location).

    With the addition of the 6 GHz band and its 480 MHz of additional bandwidth, Wi-Fi 6E will offer more frequencies and a higher speed (up to 11 Gbps in theory).

    Last but not least, it better manages the active and sleep status of connected devices. Less strain will be put on the batteries of smartphones, tablets and laptops and they will thus last longer.

    The transition to Wi-Fi 6E will not be mandatory. Current devices, even if they do not have access to the new band, can still be used without any problems.

  • FAQ

    The recognised training centres are the following:

  • FAQ

    The recognised training centres are the following:

  • FAQ

    Fixed-term or permanent? 

    Check whether you have a permanent contract or not: this is also specified on your invoice.

    An operator is not allowed to charge anything for the termination of a contract

    • If you have a permanent contract;
    • If your fixed-term contract started at least six months ago.

     

    You have acquired a device by way of a conditional sale?

    Good to know: If you have acquired a free or bargain price device (e.g. a mobile phone or a tablet) from your operator, he can demand an extra compensation. Even if you have signed a permanent contract. Or if you do not cancel the contract before six months have passed.  

    hat extra compensation must not exceed the value stated in a repayment table annexed to the contract. 

    If you look in that table at the month you are in you can see what extra compensation is due.

    After 24 months an operator is not allowed to charge any compensation for the device anymore. 

    More info:

    The basis of the calculation that the operator should have made for you is a monthly depreciation of the device. Each month, until month 24 the same amount should be subtracted from the residual value of that device. 

    We illustrate this below in case of a permanent contract.

    You have entered into a permanent contract. When you signed the contract, you “bought” the device for € 1.

    The repayment table annexed to the contract is shown below:

    Month Residual value Month Residual value
    0 € 240 13 € 110
    1 € 230 14 € 100
    2 € 220 15 € 90
    3 € 210 16 € 80
    4 € 200 17 € 70
    5 € 190 18 € 60
    6 € 180 19 € 50
    7 € 170 20 € 40
    8 € 160 21 € 30
    9 € 150 22 € 20
    10 € 140 23 € 10
    11 € 130 24 € 0
    12      

    You decide to terminate the contract after 8 months: the operator can then ask a compensation of € 160.

    In case of a fixed-term contract your operator has to compare the device's residual value calculated as mentioned above with the remaining subscription fees until the end of the contract (for consumers this does not exceed 2 years).

    If this balance of subscription fees is lower than the value obtained through the monthly depreciation, the operator may charge only the remaining subscription fees and not the entire residual value of the device.

     

    Use of Easy Switch

    Please use the Easy Switch procedure if you want to switch bundles completely.

    The new operator will handle the entire transfer for you!

  • FAQ

    You have an e-mail address without a domain name from your current telecoms operator

    For instance: you have your own domain name (jean@dupont.be) or you use a Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo... address.

    You can always keep that e-mail address.

     

    You have an e-mail address with a domain name from your current telecoms operator

    For instance: jean.dupont@skynet.be, jean.dupont@telenet.be...

    You can keep that e-mail address for 18 months. This service is free but you have to request it before the end of your subscription. During that period, you can share your new e-mail address with your contacts. Your operator must offer you one of the following options:

    •    Keep on using your previous e-mail address for 18 months.
    •    Immediately close your previous e-mail address and forward the e-mails sent to the previous address to the new one for 18 months.

    After this 18-month period, the operator may offer the possibility to keep these facilities, but upon your request and against payment. 
     

  • FAQ

    My operator has been granted a derogation regarding roaming. What does that mean?

    Operators have the right to submit an application to BIPT to receive a derogation allowing them to apply roaming surcharges in the European Union (and associated countries: Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein).

    Currently no Belgian operator has been granted such a derogation.

    Surcharges applied pursuant to such a derogation may not exceed the following amounts: 

    What you do How much you pay
    (VAT included)
    You call Maximum 3.8 eurocents per call minute on top of the domestic tariff
    You receive a call Maximum 0.94 eurocent per call minute
    You send an SMS Maximum 1.2 eurocent per SMS on top of the domestic tariff
    You receive an SMS No surcharge possible
    You surf the Internet Maximum 0.34 eurocent per megabyte on top of the domestic tariff

  • FAQ

    All you need to know about 5G

    The Regions’ general brief aiming to regulate the protection of the environment also entails the power to adopt measures to prevent and minimise the risks related to the non-ionising radiation. It is therefore the Regions that define the radiation standards (standards for maximum emission) the operators have to comply with. The mobile operators are required to comply with these radiation standards, regardless of the technology they use. 

    The Regions also carry out inspections in the field to verify whether the radiation standards set by them are complied with. 

    For more information or to request radiation measurements, we invite you to contact your regional administration in charge:

    • Brussels Capital Region
      Brussels Environment
      Tel. 02 775 75 75
       
    • Flanders
      Environmental Department of the Flemish Government
      Tel. 02 553 83 50
       
    • Wallonia
      Institut scientifique de service public
      Tel. 04 229 82 35 (info-ISSEP) 

  • FAQ

    Most manufacturers commercialise 5G compatible telephones but the majority of the Belgian users does not have such a device. In general, a new device will have to be purchased in order to be able to use 5G.

    All you need to know about 5G

  • FAQ

    All you need to know about 5G

    At the request of the Brussels Region, the BIPT carried out a study in September 2018 already, to determine which radiation standards would be necessary to roll out mobile 5G networks (5G). The technical report regarding the impact of the current Brussels radiation standards on the roll-out of mobile networks concluded that, taking into account the expected increase in data traffic and a desired roll-out of 5G, the radiation standards needed to be adjusted. The report was about 5G roll-out, but it also warned that 4G networks too risked congestion in the long run. That was confirmed by the study of 8 March 2021, in which the BIPT predicts the risks of congestion of the 4G networks in 3 major cities:

    • The study predicts that the 4G networks in Antwerp do not risk a considerable congestion.
    • In Liège the risk of a partial congestion during peak hours is expected for 4G networks. 
    • For Brussels the study warns against a risk of a major congestion during peak hours for 4G networks.

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