• FAQ

    With these tips you can do something about that.

    Modem and router

    No Internet without a modem and router.

    • A modem translates the signal your operator injects through cable, ADSL or fibre into a signal that your PC, smart TV etc. can read, thus ensuring the Internet connection.
    • The modem transmits the Internet signal to the router which distributes that signal across different devices.
      The modem and router functionalities are often combined in one single device.

    Place your modem (which generally also includes the Wi-Fi router) in the best spot.

    The best spot is:

    • Central: the further away you are from the transmitter, the weaker the signal;
    • As high as possible;
    • Away from obstacles: the signal circulates better when the modem is situated on a cleared spot. The walls and doors are also obstacles between you and the modem that transmits the Wi-Fi signal;
    • Away from other specific devices: electronic equipment operating on radio signals, such as baby alarms, weather stations, cordless telephones ..., can interfere with your Wi-Fi signal. Make sure there is a minimum distance of 30 cm between such equipment and your modem. Better still: switch them off if you use the Wi-Fi connection. 

    Change the frequency band

    Another Wi-Fi channel can result in a bigger Internet range. Three frequency bands are currently available to transmit Wi-Fi signals:

    • 2.4 GHz (2400-2483.5 MHz): this frequency band is used a lot, so that there is much traffic on this network. This sometimes results in a slower connection. By contrast this band has the advantage that the signals travel further and penetrate obstacles such as walls, floors ... more easily;
    • 5.0 GHz (5150-5350 MHz and 5470-5725 MHz): in general this network is more stable because there is less interference from other equipment. Considering the available bandwidth this band allows for a much bigger capacity compared to the 2.4 GHz. This band is supported by most, but not all receivers. Moreover, this frequency band has the disadvantage that the distance the signals can travel is smaller than in the 2.4 GHz band. The higher the frequency band, the more difficult it is for signals to penetrate through obstacles;
    • 6 GHz (5945-6425 MHz):  This frequency band provides a higher bitrate, a shorter response time and better management of the connections in case of a high density of users, as for public hotspots. To fully benefit from its use, compatible equipment is required however. (more information)

    Change the Wi-Fi channel

    Wi-Fi routers distribute the signal across various devices. In principle they automatically select a channel for the Wi-Fi network. However, you can improve the Wi-Fi signal by selecting a channel manually, e.g. if the neighbours are using the same channel (which could interfere with your connection). 

    The 2.4 GHz frequency band has 13 channels with a bandwidth of 20 MHz. Choose another channel in case of interference.

    The 5 GHz frequency band has 23 channels with a bandwidth of 20 MHz. The channels above 5.47 GHz (with numbers starting from 100) are the most powerful, but they are not suited for all types of equipment. These channels can be combined in order to obtain 160 MHz (two channels of 160 MHz maximum as this frequency band is divided into different sections). 

    The new 6 GHz band is divided into seven channels with a bandwidth of 160 MHz and 14 more traditional 80 MHz channels. Here compatible devices (and routers) are required as well.

    The available Wi-Fi channels can be scanned and measured with specific software, such as a “Wi-Fi Analyzer” for Android, or “inSSIDer” for Windows and “Network Analyzer” for iOS.

    On your operator’s website an explanation is given on how to select a different Wi-Fi channel.

    Could my equipment be the cause of the problem?

    Older tablets, PCs, smartphones ... slow down your Wi-Fi connection. Avoid connecting your Wi-Fi to devices that are older than 5 years. Not only will the Wi-Fi work slower for this device, it also has an impact on the performance of other, more recent devices that use the Wi-Fi.
    If you want to use older equipment anyway, do not connect it to the Wi-Fi, but use an Ethernet cable instead (at least Cat. 5 or 6). In any case an Ethernet cable will offer a faster and more reliable connection than Wi-Fi for any device.

    Before buying new devices, you should also check whether they at least support the Wi-Fi 5 standard (802.11ac) and maximum the Wi-Fi 6 or 6E standard (802.11ax). The recent Wi-Fi 6E uses the same technology as Wi-Fi 6 but makes use of the 6 GHz band and allows for more broadband connections at the same time.

    Attention: the Wi-Fi 6E frequency bands in Europe differ from those in the United States so always check whether the equipment is indeed suited for use in Europe before your purchase.

    Do not simultaneously connect too many devices to the Wi-Fi either, in order not to overload the network; if necessary opt for “wired” Internet and use an Ethernet cable. If that is not possible, you can use an Ethernet adapter, which will then enable you to connect an Ethernet cable by way of a USB port.

  • FAQ

    A wireless local area network allows you to interconnect your devices and radio waves enable the rapid exchange of data.

    The term “Wi-Fi” was coined to get a simpler term to refer to the standards of the group IEEE 802.11, which are the ones used for wireless networks. Since 1999, several versions have followed one another, improving the quality of data transmitted per second, the signal range or the connection quality. The latest publicly accessible version is called Wi-Fi 6 (the official name of the standard is “IEEE 802.11ax”).

    Several devices are already compatible with Wi-Fi 6 or Wi-Fi 6E; these are very recent. Concerning your modem/router, there will be some time before this technology is included. At present, the Wi-Fi signal transmitted by your modem/router uses two frequency bands (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz):

    • 2.4 GHz: This frequency band, shared by numerous types of use, enables the transmission of signals over long distances and is not affected by barriers created by walls or floors;
    • 5 GHz: This frequency band is more stable and faster. Regarding data transmission, it has more and broader channels: there are 13 channels of 20 MHz or 40 MHz on 2.4 GHz. On 5 GHz, there are 13 channels of 20, 40 and 80 MHz. Most receivers are compatible with this band, which is a bit more sensitive to the presence of obstacles than the 2.4 GHz band.

    Wi-Fi 6 also uses these frequency bands. In the next development, Wi-Fi 6E (E meaning “extended”) will add the 6 GHz band.

    Compared with the previous versions, Wi-Fi 6 and Wi-Fi 6E offer:

    • A higher speed (channels up to 120 MHz);
    • A shorter response time;
    • A better connection management in case of high user density (when a large number of users are simultaneously connected to the same network, at the same location).

    With the addition of the 6 GHz band and its 480 MHz of additional bandwidth, Wi-Fi 6E will offer more frequencies and a higher speed (up to 11 Gbps in theory).

    Last but not least, it better manages the active and sleep status of connected devices. Less strain will be put on the batteries of smartphones, tablets and laptops and they will thus last longer.

    The transition to Wi-Fi 6E will not be mandatory. Current devices, even if they do not have access to the new band, can still be used without any problems.

  • FAQ

    My operator has been granted a derogation regarding roaming. What does that mean?

    Operators have the right to submit an application to BIPT to receive a derogation allowing them to apply roaming surcharges in the European Union (and associated countries: Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein).

    Currently no Belgian operator has been granted such a derogation.

    Surcharges applied pursuant to such a derogation may not exceed the following amounts: 

    What you do How much you pay
    (VAT included)
    You call Maximum 3.8 eurocents per call minute on top of the domestic tariff
    You receive a call Maximum 0.94 eurocent per call minute
    You send an SMS Maximum 1.2 eurocent per SMS on top of the domestic tariff
    You receive an SMS No surcharge possible
    You surf the Internet Maximum 0.34 eurocent per megabyte on top of the domestic tariff

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